Autism and Work

Employment is an important part of our lives – it provides financial security, social connection, and builds our self-esteem.

However, for autistic people, the path to employment can be challenging. In Australia, the unemployment rate for autistic people is 31% – almost six times that of people without disability, and three times the rate of people with disability generally. Unemployment and underemployment can have lifelong effects, including loss of confidence and self-esteem, increased mental health issues, and dependence on government and family support.

Autistic people bring unique strengths, skills and talents to the workforce. As we look to a future that is more complex than ever, the genuine diversity of thinking that autistic people offer can drive innovation and create positive, inclusive change in Australia.

Spectrospective will share the stories of autistic people – from those dreaming of what they’ll do in the future to those who are in their dream job now – to bust myths, change attitudes and show Australia how much autistic people have to offer the world of work.

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About Amaze

Established in 1967, Amaze is the peak body in Victoria for autistic people and their supporters. Amaze’s social impact aspiration is for a society that respects the dignity of every autistic person and provides meaningful opportunities for them to participate and contribute.

Our three main goals are to:

• Increase community understanding, engagement and acceptance of autism;

• Improve attitudes and behaviours towards autistic people;

• Create more opportunities for autistic people to participate and contribute to society in meaningful ways.

For more information visit www.amaze.org.au

More Information

Visit www.amaze.org.au


 

About Autism

Autism is a neuro developmental disability with symptoms that appear early in life. Every autistic person is different but these features are present in some form:

• Challenges with communication, social interaction and reciprocity (understanding unspoken social rules; delay or lack of speech)

• Patterns of restricted, repetitive behaviours (intense focus, special interests and desire for routine)

Autism is not a disease. People are born on the autism spectrum. It is a lifelong disability and there is no cure, but the way it affects people may change over time as a person grows and matures. Approximately 1% of the population is on the autism spectrum. Currently, three times as many males are diagnosed than females.

For more information visit www.amaze.org.au

 

 

 

More Information

Visit www.amaze.org.au


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