Autism and Education

More than 8 in 10 autistic students face difficulties in education.

Autism is unique in every person, but mostly these challenges include fitting in socially and challenges with learning and communication.

The majority of Australians (74%) agree schools should have a better understanding of how to support autistic students.

Modifying the curriculum, greater teacher education and training, changing test and exam procedures, adjusting the sensory environment, supporting students transitioning into and between schools, providing information to other students about autism, are some of the many ways schools and the wider community can create a better school experience for autistic students.

This year, Spectrospective is focusing on education.

At Amaze, we believe the best way to help others understand the needs of autistic people is to hear directly from autistic people and their families.
By hearing your views about what support you need at school or college or university, others can build a better understanding.

We want all autistic students to have the best school experience and results they can.
By telling your story and your wishes for how education could be better for you, you’re educating others and will be part of shaping a better education future for all autistic students.

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About Amaze

Established in 1967, Amaze is the peak body in Victoria for autistic people and their supporters. Amaze’s social impact aspiration is for a society that respects the dignity of every autistic person and provides meaningful opportunities for them to participate and contribute.

Our three main goals are to:

• Increase community understanding, engagement and acceptance of autism;

• Improve attitudes and behaviours towards autistic people;

• Create more opportunities for autistic people to participate and contribute to society in meaningful ways.

More Information

Visit www.amaze.org.au


 

About Autism

Autism is a neuro developmental disability with symptoms that appear early in life. Every autistic person is different but these features are present in some form:

• Challenges with communication, social interaction and reciprocity (understanding unspoken social rules; delay or lack of speech)

• Patterns of restricted, repetitive behaviours (intense focus, special interests and desire for routine)

Autism is not a disease. People are born on the autism spectrum. It is a lifelong disability and there is no cure, but the way it affects people may change over time as a person grows and matures. Approximately 1% of the population is on the autism spectrum. Currently, three times as many males are diagnosed than females.

 

More Information

Visit www.amaze.org.au